Comparative Study Of Pneumonia Severity Index (psi) & Curb-65 Score In Assessing Severity Of Community Acquired Pneumonia

Indian Journal of Applied Basic Medical Sciences
Year: 2021, Volume: 23(A), Issue. (1)
First page: (61) Last page: (71)
Online ISSN: 2249-7935
Print ISSN: 0975-8917
doi: 10.48165/ijabms.2021.23107

Comparative Study Of Pneumonia Severity Index (psi) & Curb-65 Score In Assessing Severity Of Community Acquired Pneumonia
Vijay Patel1 and Sanket Makwana2*
1Ex-post graduate student, 2Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, C. U. Shah Medical College & Hospital, Surendranagar, Gujarat.
Corresponding Author: Sanket Makwana, Email:san4mak@gmail.com

Online Published on 02-February-2021

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION:Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disorder with an incidence of about 20% to 30% in developing countries compared to an incidence of 3% to 4 % in developed countries. It is very difficult to find causative organism of community acquired pneumonia in every patient despite aggressive laboratory investigation and blood or sputum culture and it takes few days for it. It is believed that definite prognostic score will be very useful for stratifying patients at high risk and require critical care unit treatment. Pneumonia severity index (PSI) score and CURB-65 Score are two prognostic scoring systems that can stratify patients requiring intensive care unit treatment. Each prognostic score has individual pros and cons and both can be used supplementary to each other. So here we want to study the reliability and validity of PSI and CURB 65 score in Indian population with pneumonia.MATERIAL & METHOD:A hospital based comparative observational study included total 50 patients with pneumonia based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Complete clinical history and physical examination done. At the time of initial evaluation, chest radiograph was done and repeated after 48 hours. ECG, ABGA, serum electrolyte measurement, sputum for gram staining and culture, blood cultures (in selected patients), complete blood counts, blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and fasting blood glucose were measured in every patient. Analysis was done with help of SPSS software and using Microsoft Excel 2012.RESULTS:In our study, total 50 patients were enrolled among them 34 patients were male while 16 patients were female. Most common organism cultured was klebsiella species that was in 18 (36%) patients while 18 patients had no organisms seen in sputum culture. In our study, 8(16%) patients were died out of 50 patients admitted. PSI class 4 showed highest sensitivity in predicting mortality 50%, while specificity was highest for class 2 with 90.4%, followed by class 5 with 73.8%. The PPV was highest for class 4 22%, and NPV was highest for class 4 87.5%. Among CURB 65 score, class 4 showed highest sensitivity in predicting mortality 50%, while specificity was highest for class 4 with 92.8%, followed by class 3 with 85.7%. The PPV was highest for class 4= 57.1%, and NPV was highest for class 4= 90.6%.CONCLUSION:It is observed that PSI has better specificity and negative predictive value (NPV) but less sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). This is because impact of age is observed in PSI which leads to lower estimation of severity of CAP mostly in young patients who have no other comorbidities. The two scoring CURB-65 and PSI approaches have to be viewed at the most as being complementary as each has different strengths and weaknesses. With help of CURB-65 and PSI Score, we can better understand the prognosis and classify patients on basis of severity and adequate utilization of resources and proper treatment to improve outcome in developing countries like India.

Keywords

Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP), Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI), CURB-65

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