Emerging Role of Magnesium in Modern Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Obstetrics & Critical Care

Indian Journal of Applied Basic Medical Sciences
Year: 2020, Volume: 22(B), Issue. (2)
First page: (355) Last page: (366)
Online ISSN: 2249-7935
Print ISSN: 0975-8917
doi:10.48165/ijabms.2020.22227

Emerging Role of Magnesium in Modern Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Obstetrics &  Critical Care
Manisha Kapdi
Associate professor of Anaesthesia, NHLM Medical college  Ahmedabad Gujarat India
Corresponding author email id:  manisha_ kapdi@ Yahoo.com

Online Published on 02-July-2020

ABSTRACT

Magnesium is a ancient cation but it can be used successfully as adjuvant to Local  anaesthetic agent.iIt can be used successfully in various Surgeries like neurosurgery,  cardiac surgery,as induced hypotensive agent,in FESS Surgeries, used for attenuation of  pressure response to laryngoscopy& intubation,also to prevent postoperative sore throat.It  can be used in critical care,& in obstetrics to prevent Eclampsia.In present article various  uses of Magnesium sulfate discussed. Introduction Magnesium is the second most abundant intracellular cation1,2 and the fourth when the  extracellular medium is also considered1. It is involved biological reactions, such as3:  hormone binding to receptors, flow of trans-membrane ions, regulation of the adenylate  kinase system, muscle contraction, neuronal activity, vasomotor tone, cardiac excitability,  release of neurotransmitters, and calcium binding to calcium channels. In 1906, Haulbold and Meltzer reported sensorial and mo-tor blockades in humans  after the intrathecal administration of magnesium; in 1950, magnesium was used in  anesthesia, mainly to control seizures in gravidas. Currently, it has several applications in  anesthesia, obstetrics, and critical care3-5. The objective of present review was to access  the physiology, pharmacology, and reduction in plasma levels of magnesium, as well as  some of its applications in obstetrics, anesthesia, analgesia,& critical care

Keywords

neurosurgery,  cardiac surgery, laryngoscopy, Eclampsia, Magnesium